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Shelter Plus Care

Shelter Plus Care, a 59 unit permanent apartment program for individuals and families developed through a Federal Grant Program funded by the Housing and Urban Development, provides rental assistance and case management to homeless individuals with disabilities and their families. New Choices Recovery Center was awarded the Shelter Plus Care Grant for the 34 unit program in 1994 and the 25 unit grant was awarded in 1999.

The screening and referral process includes assessment of individual needs, motivation and likelihood of stability, and continuing commitment to abstaining from drug and alcohol use. Participants meet with their case manager on a regular basis to set goals and receive support in recovery and vocational/educational goals. During monthly groups participants give each other support and encouragement, share resources, meet with key community providers and assist each other in developing a healthy, sober life style.

Who is Eligible?
To be eligible for the S+C program, a person must be both homeless and disabled. In the case of a homeless household, at least one adult member must be considered disabled, as described below..

Homelessness
The S+C program specifically targets homeless persons who:
1) Are sleeping in places not meant for human beings, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, and abandoned or condemned buildings; or are sleeping in emergency shelters.
2) or are persons being discharged within the week from institutions in which they have been residents for more than 30 consecutive days; and (1) no subsequent residences have been identified; and (2) they lack the resources and support networks needed to obtain access to housing.

Other Homeless Persons
Persons are also considered to be homeless if they:
1) are graduating from transitional housing specifically for homeless persons;
2) are being evicted within the week from private dwelling units and (1) no subsequent residences have been identified; and (2) they lack the resources and support networks needed to obtain access to housing;
3) or are persons being discharged within the week from institutions in which they have been residents for more than 30 consecutive days; and (1) no subsequent residences have been identified; and (2) they lack the resources and support networks needed to obtain access to housing.

Please Note:

Not all persons being evicted from private dwelling units or all persons being discharged from institutions are homeless. Applicants who propose to serve these populations must make clear in their applications that they (a) understand that persons are eligible only if they have no subsequent residence identified and lack the resources and support networks needed to access housing and (b) propose to serve only eligible persons. Applicants that are selected for funding will be required to have documentation of how it was determined that such persons did not have the resources or support network needed to obtain housing.

In summary, a person is homeless if, without the HUD assistance, they would have to spend the night in a shelter or in a place not meant for human habitation.
            
            
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